the global mobulid conservation programme

Munk's Devil Ray, Mobula munkiana, Ensenada Grande, Isla Espiritu Santo, Baja, Mexico © Guy Stevens, Manta Trust 2015 (8).JPG
 

what is the global mobulid conservation programme?

"In 2014, the Manta Trust and its collaborators assembled and launched the Global Mobulid Conservation Programme - a strategic and long-term plan to ensure the conservation of the world's mobulid rays."

In the last two decades manta and devil rays (mobulids) have faced increasing threats from both targeted and bycatch fisheries, due in part to a growing trade in their highly valued gill plates. Their conservative life history traits (slow growth, late maturity and low fecundity) make these animals extremely susceptible to any consumptive exploitation. Due to the vulnerability of these species, it is vital that this issue is addressed immediately in order to prevent regional extinctions, and to ensure that regulations are adhered to.

In 2014, the Manta Trust and its collaborators assembled and launched the Global Mobulid Conservation Programme (GMCP) - a strategic and long-term plan to ensure the conservation of the world's mobulid rays. It is the conservation initiative that sits at the core of everything we do as a charity, and it is driven by our long-term vision to ensure stable or increasing populations of mobulid rays around the world.

In this programme we work together with policy makers, national governments and trade officials, as well as local communities and NGOs in key mobulid fishing nations. We aim to extend current research efforts studying mobulid rays, with a specific focus on furthering the knowledge of key biological aspects of these species’ life history - information that is crucial to monitoring and regulating fisheries, and making informed management decisions. We ultimately seek to diminish mobulid fisheries and associated trade, whilst providing alternative livelihoods, and opportunities to involve, raise awareness, and educate the general public across key target nations.

Reef Manta Ray, Manta alfredi, Hanifaru Beyru, Baa Atoll, Maldives © Guy Stevens, Manta Trust 2016.JPG
 

the goal of the programme

The long-term goal of the GMCP is to reduce the key threat that fisheries pose to manta and devil rays. This requires addressing both the levels of bycatch and targeted fisheries that threaten these rays, particularly within key mobulid fishing nations.

To realise this goal, the GMCP organises its activities under three overarching objectives:

 
 
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(1) Changing policy

To ensure relevant and comprehensive policies are in place to regulate trade and fishing of mobulid rays.

 
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(2) Building capacities

To ensure that governments and local communities are able to support and embrace protective measures for mobulid rays.

 
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(3) Strategic Development

To ensure that the Manta Trust charity has a five year plan and funding strategy for its work on global mobulid conservation.

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target countries

Since 2016, we have chosen to focus the GMCP on three target countries in order to achieve the programme's objectives. 

Indonesia, Sri Lanka and Peru all show a political readiness for engagement and viability for conservation advancement. They also host some of the world’s largest mobulid fisheries, and in all locations, we are already working with Affiliate Projects on the ground.

You can learn more about the collaborative work we are coordinating in these target countries, and what we have achieved, by exploring the following pages:

 
 
 
 
 
Munk's Devil Ray, Mobula munkiana, Ensenada Grande, Isla Espiritu Santo, Baja, Mexico © Guy Stevens, Manta Trust 2015 (12).JPG

principal funders

 

 
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(formerly The Global Partnership for Sharks & Rays)

 
 
 

 

PROGRAMME COLLABORATORS

 
 
 
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